Historic Latta Plantation House

Latta Plantation House in Huntersville, North Carolina.

The Latta Plantation House is “an especially interesting early Federal house with a plan unique for its period in North Carolina” (nomination papers for the National Register of Historic Places).

Garden view of the Latta Plantation House in Huntersville, North Carolina.

After 20 years of neglect the House has been beautifully restored thanks to a group of citizens who had discovered the dilapidated house in the 1970s and formed a private non-profit entity to save and restore the property.

Panorama of the Latta Plantation House in Huntersville, North Carolina.

The Latta Plantation House offers daily guided tours, summer camps, homeschool programs, workshops and educational field trips.

See What Life was like on a Plantation

The Latta Plantation House offers guided tours, which run daily. They also offer summer camps, homeschool programs, workshops and educational field trips. Over 12,000 school children visit this historic site annually.

Several historic events are also hosted throughout the year where the Historic Latta Plantation staff dresses in period attire to reenact the history and bring it back to life for everybody to enjoy.

History of the Latta Plantation House

Irish native James Latta (1755-1837) was a traveling merchant and planter, who in 1785 immigrated to the United States with his wife Elizabeth and his two sons William (1781-1829) and Robert (1783-1852). It is believed that he built the Latta Plantation home soon after he had purchased the initial 100 acres east of the Catawba River in 1799. In 1805, James Latta acquired land in York, South Carolina, some 30 miles (48 km) south of his home, where he operated a mercantile business, which his son Robert took over in 1812. By then James Latta had expanded his land holdings around his homestead to 320 acres. He also owned half of a nearby fishery.

The nomination papers for the National Register of Historic Places describe the Latta Plantation House as “an especially interesting early Federal house with a plan unique for its period in North Carolina. The fine stair with elements of Georgian design, the rather elaborate mantels, and the consistent use throughout the house of graceful, skillfully executed early Federal motifs make the Latta House one of the very best of its period in the upper Piedmont”.

The Latta Planation House became part of the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.

After James Latta’s death in 1837, the property was sold to David Harry, who died in 1849. Four years later in 1853, the property was acquired by William A. Sample. The home remained in the Sample family until 1922, when it was sold to the Catawba Manufacturing Company, which became part of the Duke Power Company in 1927. The house was rented out to tenant farmers until the 1950s, when the site was abandoned.

In 1969, the Crescent Land and Timber Corporation, a subsidiary of Duke Power Company, acquired the land adjacent to the house. Today this land, which is now the → Latta Plantation Nature Preserve, is owned by Mecklenburg County and offers wonderful trails for hiking and horseback riding.

Neglected for over 20 years, the dilapidated Latta Plantation House was discovered by a group of citizens recognizing its historical and structural significance, who then formed a private non-profit entity in the 1970s to save and restore the property and open it to the public.

Several historic events are reenacted in period attire where history is brought back to life for visitors to enjoy.